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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
they tell sounds like something out of the future not the past. it's a story of how america with a combination of vision, high-tech know how and good old fashioned courage answered the challenge of a rival stepped into the unknown and achieved what almost seems as unbelievable today as it was a half century ago. >> it was october 4th, 1957, and at the height of the cold war. the soviets launched a satellite named sputnik which orbited the earth in over an hour and a half. >> they tell us the world may never be the same again. >> in 1957 when i was still in flight school sputnik was launched the beginning of the space age. >> the dawn of the space age was the start of the space race. america competing with the soviets for scientific dominance. but in a world where americans dug bomb shelters and worried about muss ills science spelled national security. >> the cold war had been pro clonged it was going on nobody could really see an end to it. there were all of the underlying risk of nuclear confrontations in the times. >> man wants it that required a few good men 7 to start w
he reportedly has all of the nurses charm he's well cared for. get well soon mr. president. america loves you. [ applause ] before we go thank you to governoruc had huck for trusting me to fill in for him this week . thank you, audience for being here, good night. [ applause ] ♪ >> socialism. the new craze. >> i am not a liberal. >> i was raised a socialist. my families are not liberals. they were socialists. >> we collected some great hollywood interviews and it all starts right now. >> once upon a time you and i actually felt journalism was a calling. >> i still think i'm doing something noble. >> caution. you are about to enter the no-spin zone. the factor begins right now. >> him bill o'reilly. thanks for watching "the factor goes holy" actors yuck nor russian james kaan, kelsy grammar have something to say about how this done hi tri-has changed. >> if we look at history, our greet country and freedom are under attack. we're at a tipping point and quite possibly our country as woe know it may be lost forever if we don't change the course our countried headed. >> you're saying,
in america we will outperform the other schools in five years. how good our charter schools? >> unions say they are four problem kids. >> up until now the adults have run the show and make us stupid in america. school spending has tripled over the past 40 years. three sped much more than other countries but what do we get? student learning? no improvement. look at it. there is the line. 40 years the scores have been flat much more money no improvement that there is good news and around america very cool things are starting to happen. >> school is boring. >> knollwood is not. >> as it is. i went to school. grade school was boring so was high school and so was princeton except for the party part of fourth grade? we have to learn reading and writing and that is work. >> reading is work but it is rocking also. >> they say school is fun? how is it fun to learn? >> they teach us enough on ways to make you look forward to going to school in the morning? >> yes. >> the attend a new charter schools the charter lets them escape the bureaucracy of regular school including the teachers union. this in
. [applause] john: america has more than 400 billionaires'. i say they are cheap because until recently they did not give a lot to charity. 1997 ted turner promised to donate $1 billion to the wind. united nations? they squandered money. if business tycoons do more for the world than two reinvests of the business creates jobs and wealth for everyone. why is giving away better? >> why not do both? john: i am happy if bill gates gives nothing. >> this is why people don't like newsmen. i know your dirty tricks. there is nothing more to say. good by. i of walking off the set. [laughter] john: it is true that businessmen like ted turner to the right thing. says your on broke from the ayn rand institute. how did they become a billionaire? creating a product service to benefit everybody we know because it pays -- repay for it. we get more value than what we give up. bill gates has improved hundreds of millions of lives he has touched every human being. >> to also employ people that charity keeps on giving. >> you pay employees but they are better off. what about the companies that provided sof
in america. why do people freeload? what you think you know, often is not so. myth and truth. that is our show. tonight. john: what you think you know, may not be so? we know what. we watch tv while good what we know not be so? our instincts are often wrong. when i was a consumer reporter i thought consumer regulation was the answer. rahm. it hurts america of more. i thought america was running out of fuel, overpopulation, made in america. wrong. >> majority leader harry reid is upset the usoc bought uniforms from china. >> they should be burned and start over again. john: people are desperate for jobs. isn't it outrageous we buy uniforms made overseas? no. in this stupid. let me bring in professional help. why not to worry about sending work to other countries? >> a fundamental trade makes everybody off. it benefits both parties. john: they could have been made by american workers. >> but we are so much better at other things that making garments is not the comparative advantage. john: that is not a problem. those are factory jobs they're not so pleasant they're designed and marketed an
the average life span was almost 40. 50 years later, 47. by 1950, it was up to 68. now, the average in america is 78. 76 for men and 81 for women. the numbers will only go up. and up. the. >> their of a book called "100 plus, the coming age of longevity will change everything." everything? >>guest: everything. >> how much longevity? >>guest: i take the premise it will be possible in for average life expectancy to go up to 150. >> there is someone alive today who will live to be 150? >>guest: absolutely. >> is that creepy? you will be shriveled? >>guest: no, we will be healthier for longer, and energetic and enjoying likes. >> because they invent body part replacements. >>guest: that is a low-hanging fruits. scientists have created brand new humoring begans using a person's adult stem cells so bladders, trachea, human blood vessels, they have been created already. >> so, assume we accept this, we are healthy, what happens to your life? you work longer? you change jobs? don't you get sick of it? >>guest: the exiting is, there will be much more opportunity. right now, with the average life span o
are getting wealthy like the united states of america. the united states decided to catch up now austria and new zealand now they are on top pushing forward but the rest of the world that is dominated but from the '60s you have small families and then the economy is good. they are catching up. then 2010 they borrow money to the richest. john: this raises to amazing results. thousands of years of human history. and everybody was stock in the lower left over thousands of years. this is just hundreds of years why are some countries still stock? >> this is the condo with the best messagest moste african countries have fast economic growth. their ideas of 20 years ago they have a better education event to antonia from 1970 to. so we can see the african john: this is wonderful. now we will all be rich. >> now at his $2 million not because they are stupid. allport people are clever or they would be dead. john: they have no love lost. >> no. or excessive credit but locked into a vicious circle of poverty. it takes a small investment to get them now.g with the young couple decides to grab the co
. [applauding] john: what does your brain tl you that america should do about our problem? we have plenty. a lot of people are poor. we should spread the wealth around. i hear busesses raise prices and gouge people. foreigners sneak into america and take american jobs, there ought to be a law, government ought to do something. that's just the way pple think, it's instinct. i have to admit how i used to think, took me decades to realize i was wrong, passing a law often does more harm than good. and progress comes from millions of individuals acting to make themselves better off guided by an invisible hand that inadvertently helps others. not to viewers of the "stossel" show, but to normal people. when there is a problem, government should address it. my next guest says they know what our brain is wired that way. an evolutionary psychiatrist at the university of california santa barbara and the author of the mind of the market. so, there is your book, let me start with you since you talk about the mind. you say the faith in government comes from evolution and? >> the natural propensity we have is
in america and deep spending cuts particularly to our military. top lawmakers are calling in staff members for meetings on this saturday. right now we are told senate leaders are working on a potential deal. still our journalists on the hill are being told there will be no official proposals or votes until tomorrow at the very earliest. the time line qoo -- could not be tighter. we will begin seeing lower tax rates expiring and federal aid for things like unemployment checks. here is a statistic for you. if there is no deal in place for january 1st, those benefits, those unemployment benefits will no longer be authorized. the law project estimates some two million americans will stop receiving benefits after december 29th. that's today. many experts fear going over the cliff could send our weak economy plunging back into a recession. president obama says he remains optimistic, but he says no bargain could be reached in congress, then congress must vote on his back up plan to block taxes for anybody making less than $250,000 a year. chief congressional correspondent mike emmanuel has more.
. >> absolutely. we work too hard. france and italy six weeks is normal. john: america does not have mandatory vacation but we have 170,000 pages of federal rules and they keep passing more. it shows how america has recovered since the great depression. to sit out this graph from dan mitchell because of these rules add this up and the government spending, tax increase coming can understand when our entrepreneurs think i do not want to hire people then i want to keep my company small then i am stuck with a mandate. i am worried we become like you're up at the same time that model is falling apart. john: we did have these laws but not as many. >> as much as seven like the regulated laissez-faire economy just make sure you have enough breathing room to prosper. over time if government grows faster than a private sector that wedge means the burden of gdp, it is not like one straw causes it to collapse, but there is a tipping point*. are we five years away from being greece or italy? twenty years? i don't know. this trendline is bad. happening under bush and obama. it does not work. john: good inte
of peace in america and chicken, but what about coor's or zebra? why don't we eat those? aren't the kind of like cows? some of you shudder at the idea, and it is illegal in some places like california and illinois. conventional wisdom says it s not right to eat a zebra or a ter buffalo or a horse. so how many of you are repulsed or bothered by the idea and would not do our taste test? a few of you. okay. it is just wrong. well, that is bought, says the chef at beaver creek ranch in texas. beavercreek is a resort where guests pay to have zebra, water buffalo, and this cute animal. they eat what they kill command they eat it afafter it has been cut by the chef. so at their ranch people come for this. they are not squeamish. >> right. fourteen different varieties of animals. pick out which one you want to hunt for. the harvest the animal, bring it back and cook it. john: people say it tastes good. >> and it's better for you because it is leaner. i have been a chef for years. it beef from the grocery store verses cooking as zebra, if you cook it and put it on the grill there is so much more
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)